Washoe judge sentences 16-year-old armed robber to prison

Something is clearly going wrong in Nevada, where young men are sentenced to serve time in adult prisons. Society has a duty to guide youngsters to the right path. Where did we fail them? We need jobs, not adult prison sentences. Our youngsters need mentoring and guidance, protecting them from going astray. Washoe Judge: the system has failed!

Reno Gazette Journal
Dec. 6, 2011
A 16-year-old father-to-be who played on his high school basketball team is now among the youngest inmates in the Nevada state prison system following a sentence of up to 10 years related to an armed robbery in Reno.

Jesus Oconitrillo-Calderon, whose nickname is “Chewy,” was sentenced Nov. 30 by Washoe District Judge David Hardy, who said the boy’s young age was not a criminal security blanket. The teen will be eligible for parole after serving just over two years in prison for guilty pleas of robbery and conspiracy to commit possession of a stolen vehicle.

Days after he was sentenced to prison, 13-year-old Jose Cruz, of Reno, was given a life term for his role in the Mother’s Day robbery-related murder of a 27-year-old man. Cruz is now the youngest state prison inmate, while Oconitrillo-Calderon joins a group of 33 Nevada inmates between 16 and 17, prison officials said.

Read the rest here

Washoe judge sentences 16-year-old armed robber to prison

Something is clearly going wrong in Nevada, where young men are sentenced to serve time in adult prisons. Society has a duty to guide youngsters to the right path. Where did we fail them? We need jobs, not adult prison sentences. Our youngsters need mentoring and guidance, protecting them from going astray. Washoe Judge: the system has failed!

Reno Gazette Journal
Dec. 6, 2011
A 16-year-old father-to-be who played on his high school basketball team is now among the youngest inmates in the Nevada state prison system following a sentence of up to 10 years related to an armed robbery in Reno.

Jesus Oconitrillo-Calderon, whose nickname is “Chewy,” was sentenced Nov. 30 by Washoe District Judge David Hardy, who said the boy’s young age was not a criminal security blanket. The teen will be eligible for parole after serving just over two years in prison for guilty pleas of robbery and conspiracy to commit possession of a stolen vehicle.

Days after he was sentenced to prison, 13-year-old Jose Cruz, of Reno, was given a life term for his role in the Mother’s Day robbery-related murder of a 27-year-old man. Cruz is now the youngest state prison inmate, while Oconitrillo-Calderon joins a group of 33 Nevada inmates between 16 and 17, prison officials said.

Read the rest here

Testimony before the Legislative Committee on Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice

On Wednesday, April 14, Campaign For Youth Justice’s CEO Liz Ryan provided testimony before Nevada’s Legislative Committee on Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice.

The Legislative Committee on Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice is an ongoing statutory committee of the Nevada Legislature which meets between the biennial sessions of the Legislature and consists of three members from the Senate and three members from the Assembly. The Committee reviews and evaluates issues relating to the provision of child welfare services and juvenile justice in the state and recommends legislation concerning child welfare and juvenile justice to the Legislature.

On this occasion, the Committee heard testimony from a number of witnesses on juvenile justice issues, including the prosecution of youth as adults. In her testimony Ryan stated that,

“An overwhelming body of research shows that prosecuting youth as adults does not work. Over the past three years, we have witnessed a steady stream of research demonstrating unequivocally that trying and sentencing children in adult court does not reduce crime; in fact, it does just the opposite.”

Further, Ryan noted that,

“In light of the research, particularly the data showing that youth prosecuted in adult criminal court are much more likely to re-offend than similarly situated youth in the juvenile justice system, a number of states have begun to reexamine their states policies and several states have changed their policies.”

According to Ryan, states have undertaken or are considering undertaking a number of policy reforms in these areas:

1. Changing the age at which youth can be eligible to be considered in adult criminal court, which Nevada did in the last session;

2. Changing the types of crimes for which youth can be eligible to be considered in adult criminal court;

3. Ending the automatic prosecution of all youth at certain ages in adult criminal court, such as at age 16 or 17;

4. Narrowing the circumstances under which youth can be placed in adult jails pretrial;

5. Removing youth from adult jails and prisons pretrial and post-conviction;

6. Providing adult criminal court judges additional discretion on whether to send youth back to juvenile court rather than prosecuting youth in adult court;

7. Changing the law to disallow youth to be subsequently tried in adult criminal court if they have been tried in adult court once; and

8. Disallowing adult mandatory minimums from applying to juveniles.

A full copy of Ryan’s testimony to Nevada’s Legislative Committee on Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice is available online at:

http://www.campaignforyouthjustice.org/documents/cfyj%20testimony%20liz%20ryan%204%2014%2010.pdf (PDF)

Further testimonies in other states here.

Mistrial declared in ‘Nevada 9’ case

From: LVRJ
Posted by John L. Smith
Wednesday, Apr. 07, 2010 at 12:36 PM

A mistrial in U.S. District Court has been declared in the civil rights case in which former state corrections officers accuse Nevada prison officials of harassment and creating a hostile workplace.

Federal Judge Philip Pro on Wednesday sent both sides back to work and scolded them for attempting to introduce exhibits into evidence at the last moment. Pro told them to prepare to return to his court fully prepared for trial in a few weeks. The judge reminded both parties in the clearest terms that “trial by ambush” is frowned upon by the court.

A hearing in the matter is set for 9 a.m. May 5.

The plaintiffs allege prison officials began a campaign of harassment after the employees promoted their union ideals on the job.

Read more here: LVRJ

http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/smith/Mistrial_declared_in_Nevada_9_case.html

Mistrial declared in ‘Nevada 9’ case

From: LVRJ
Posted by John L. Smith
Wednesday, Apr. 07, 2010 at 12:36 PM

A mistrial in U.S. District Court has been declared in the civil rights case in which former state corrections officers accuse Nevada prison officials of harassment and creating a hostile workplace.

Federal Judge Philip Pro on Wednesday sent both sides back to work and scolded them for attempting to introduce exhibits into evidence at the last moment. Pro told them to prepare to return to his court fully prepared for trial in a few weeks. The judge reminded both parties in the clearest terms that “trial by ambush” is frowned upon by the court.

A hearing in the matter is set for 9 a.m. May 5.

The plaintiffs allege prison officials began a campaign of harassment after the employees promoted their union ideals on the job.

Read more here: LVRJ

http://www.lvrj.com/blogs/smith/Mistrial_declared_in_Nevada_9_case.html