Corcoran Strike for Medical Care Leads to Hospitalization of Diabetic

From an email, Oct 9th, 2014

After a week of hunger striking by three men inside Corcoran SHU and organizers calling and writing to the prison, we are happy to report that Kambui Robinson has been moved to the Acute Care Hospital in Corcoran for his diabetic complications, and the hunger strike is now ended.

Thanks to everyone who called, wrote, or circulated the message—but our fight is not over!

Advocacy is still needed for the following issues:

Kambui Robinson’s health is in a dire state and he needs to be permanently moved into a medical care facility such as the one in Vacaville. Diabetic complications have left his eyesight so bad that he has not been able to read for several weeks, and he is has been experiencing stroke-like symptoms for
the past several weeks.

Michael Durrough is still without an extension cord for his CPAP machine, which is necessary for his sleep apnea. Without this cord, which is allowable property but currently withheld on warden’s discretion, Michael risks the possibility of stopping breathing while sleeping every night.

Heshima Denham needs immediate attention to severe pain he is experiencing on his right side. He is in constant pain and it has become extremely disruptive to daily activity. He needs an MRI as well as kidney and liver tests in order to diagnosis this pain.

We need adequate medical care for everyone in CSP-Corcoran!  At this time, please continue to contact the below officials alerting them to the immediate needs of Kambui Robinson (C-82830), Michael Dorrough (D-83611) and Heshima Denham (J-38283).  Calls to the Receiver’s office are especially welcome.  (The receiver’s office will call you back and will tell you that they can’t give out peoples’ personal medical info, but all you need to do is reply that you’re not asking for such info and are just asking that the individuals you have called about receive appropriate and timely care).

Contact information for CDCR officials:

Dave Davey
Corcoran Warden
559-992-8800 (extension not known)
dave.davey@cdcr.ca.gov

Medical Receiver
California Correctional Healthcare Services
916-691-3000
CPHCSCCUWeb@cdcr.ca.gov

Cherita Wofford
Office of the Ombudsman
916-324-6123
cherita.wofford@cdcr.ca.gov

Sara Malone
Office of the Ombudsman
916-327-8467
Sara.Malone@cdcr.ca.gov

Diana Toche
Undersecretary for Health Care Services and Undersecretary for Administration
and Offender Services, CDCR
diana.toche@cdcr.ca.gov

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Corcoran SHU prisoners start hunger strike for decent healthcare; support needed now

Sept. 28th, 2014
From: SFBayview

On Friday, Sept. 26, 2014, three men locked inside unit 4B-1L of the Secure Housing Unit (SHU) of California State Prison-Corcoran started a hunger strike:
Heshima Denham (J-38283), followed on Sept. 27 by Michael Zaharibu Dorrough (D-83611), and Kambui Robinson (C-82830) will join them the following day for a few days or as long as he can considering his poor health.

Why?
The medical care at Corcoran SHU is so bad that life-threatening situations have occurred on too many occasions to the people in the SHU and possibly also elsewhere at CSP-Corcoran that they have had to resort to a hunger strike, the ultimate nonviolent protest, in order to make this point known to the warden, the medical receiver appointed by the court to oversee California’s notoriously bad prison healthcare, and the administration of the California Department of Corrections (CDCr).

Several factors made the three decide to protest the lack of healthcare now: Kambui has diabetes that is very badly regulated with a HBA1C of 9.3 – far too high for diabetics, especially with those already suffering loss of eyesight and neuropathy – and Zaharibu has dangerous, untreated, extremely high cholesterol, making him very vulnerable to stroke, and he has untreated gall stones and a CPAP machine [for sleep apnea, can cause strokes] without an extension cord to work effectively.

Custody staff interfering with medical staff is causing dangerous situations.

What can you do to help?

Ideally we want Michael (Zaharibu) Dorrough and Kambui Robinson moved to Vacaville or New Folsom medical facilities. Kambui’s situation is most critical:

He needs more control over his insulin-dependent diabetes – better regulation, prevention of more complications, and a special diet for diabetics, with sufficient carbohydrates, low fat, whole grains, access to glucose and daily exercise outside his cell. He also needs a diagnostic scan to determine nerve damage in his brain.

For Michael Dorrough (D-83611): normal access to the CPAP machine, treatment for high cholesterol levels and treatment for gallstones.

[Note: Both Michael Dorrough and Kambui Robinson also need to be moved away from the Central Valley due to Valley Fever!]

Finally, for Heshima Denham (J-38283), we need an MRI-scan to make a diagnosis of the pain in his right side and treatment for whatever is causing it. Heshima was recently also diagnosed with PTSD.
Please keep in mind these are medical issues that should be treated with discretion.

Although I concentrate on these three people who are on a hunger strike, they have expressed that they are striking for all people with a disease or injury needing better care, chronic or not, at CSP-Corcoran.

Although I concentrate on these three people who are on a hunger strike, they have expressed that they are striking for all people with a disease or injury needing better care, chronic or not, at CSP-Corcoran.

Call or write to the Corcoran warden, or leave a message with his secretary. Below is a proposed script:

Call or email Warden Dave Davey, at 559 992-8800 or dave.davey@cdcr.ca.gov, or write to him at P.O. Box 8800, Corcoran, CA 93212-8309.

[Please cc emails to: Dr Clarence Cryer, clarence.cryer@cdcr.ca.gov , Chief Executive Officer in charge of health care at CSP-Corcoran.]

Call or send a copy of your letter or email to Diana Toche, Undersecretary for Health Care Services and Undersecretary for Administration and Offender Services, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Correctional Health Care Services, P.O. Box 942883, Sacramento, CA 94283-0001, 916-691-0209, Diana.toche@cdcr.ca.gov.

Also send a copy to the Medical Receiver, California Correctional Health Care Services, Controlled Correspondence Unit, P.O. Box 588500, Elk Grove, CA 95758, CPHCSCCUWeb@cdcr.ca.gov.

Finally, contact the Ombudsman, at Cherita.Wofford@cdcr.ca.gov.

Suggested script for your phone call, email or letter:

I am contacting you concerning the lack of specialized healthcare for people inside the CSP-Corcoran SHU, especially those with chronic diseases. I would like to make you aware of the fact that there is a hunger strike going on inside to demand that people with diabetes or sleep apnea and in need of special diets and other mental and physical healthcare get treated as they would when not incarcerated. Insulin-dependent diabetics with complications and patients with CPAP machines, mental illness such as PTSD and other mental challenges should not be in the SHU but in a medical facility.

The healthcare system in several California prisons is failing badly and we demand prompt action now:

Either move the diabetic patients and the CPAP-machine patients, as well as all other chronic disease patients, to a medical facility or improve the healthcare system, including the rules for, for instance, MRI scans in CSP-Corcoran.

MRI scans are only allowed when there is a physically visible wound. This is wrong!
Also, prevent custody staff from interfering with medical issues, please!

I respectfully insist you act this week to start making specific and general improvements to the healthcare in CSP-Corcoran SHU, before lives are lost.

Thank you.

Humiliation and loss: Mass cell searches at Corcoran SHU

May 31, 2014
by Ajamu Watu (Terrance E. White)
In: SF Bay View

Revolutionary greetings!

As of this writing, I’m finally getting situated from another mass cell search being done here at the Corcoran SHU by Gestapo police. This is supposed to be a once a year ordeal, so they searched the whole yard. Well, if so, then why do we get searched so often at different, unexpected times and why do they use K9 dogs and the metal detectors on us and our mattresses?

This cell search had to be my most humiliating one yet, because we were escorted from our housing units in our boxers, T-shirts – or no T-shirt if you chose – and our shower shoes all the way to R&R visiting room to walk through the metal detectors after we were strip-searched at our cell doors before we came out. There was also female staff assisting with this so-called protocol, and I was told COs (correctional officers, or guards) even came from other yards to help out.

We had our mattresses scanned through the electronic metal detector but were not given any new bed linen when this ordeal was over. Of course our cells – our living quarters – were trashed so bad that it took a lot of us two days to get back somewhat comfortable.

The long walk in the hot sun around the whole yard and being locked in our stand-up yard cages all day with some cages not having running water and us not being able to bring our lunches with us caused medical problems for those who are up in age – 40-plus. I’ve just gotten over a two-day migraine from the ordeal.

I was informed – and found out it to be true – once I returned to my cell that the fascist oppressors were taking all extra clothing, any alleged appliances such as a TV that may be missing any parts to it, with no regard to you still being able to use it or if you have another one on the way. If you’re using two cable cord antennas or loose wires, they’re taking that too.

In some cases, you need more than one antenna to pick up the digital channel because it’s hard to do so in some cells due to the reception or your digital antenna’s cord is not long enough to reach your back wall where the reception is better. In my case, my ground antenna was snatched from the wall by these Gestapo fascist pigs with no regard as to why, when it was very unnecessary since my cable outlet was not missing the metal plate that covers it.

We haven’t been given our cell search slips yet, but I’ve already started my 602 appeal form that I will still be processing to note the unprofessional way my cell was handled in this search. When I had the section CO look at my cable outlet, he informed me it was broken off. I informed him my TV signal wasn’t working but my radio was.

He then told me to 602 it but made no attempt to retrieve another cable cord to hold me until the opportune time when I can purchase another one which is what it’s gonna boil down to because they’re not gonna replace it. When this happens – the cell searches lasted all week but I think they’re still not finished with a few more buildings – we get no program, no yard, showers, laundry or access to the law library, which they’ve cancelled unless you have a court date approaching, and in some cases you may still not be able to go.

The excuses are always the same: short on staff who really don’t feel like doing anything and since the S&Es do the medical escorts, it gives the building COs time to sit down on their lazy behinds and collect a paycheck. I’m sure you all will get more mail from inmates here at Corcoran with these stories of how this cell search affected these buildings. I’m positive some were handled worse than others depending on who was doing the search.

This to us is just another day living in the concrete tomb known as the Corcoran SHU graveyard. The struggle continues …

One love, one movement!

Ajamu Wadu, a servant of the oppressed people

Send our brother some love and light: Terrance E. White, AG-8738, Cor SHU 4B-1R-26L, P.O. Box 3481, Corcoran CA 93212.

CSP-Corcoran SHU: applications not usable for lack of sockets, property allowed by property matrix, but not allowed by staff, and other ills

One of those every-day annoyances of being confined 24/7 in a cell with two people:

CSP-Corcoran should solve the issue of not being allowed an extension chord. Since there was a new property matrix installed since January, which reflects the new administrative policy of prisoners being allowed two appliances each, for instance a typewriter (yes, this is the 21st century!), the prison still does not allow an extra extension chord (with an extra socket) per appliance, whereas there are only 2 sockets per cell, for those sharing a 1 man cell with 2. Also, prisoners were threatened with write-ups if they all decided to demand a single cell per person.

Prison employees told the prisoners that power will be cut when more extension chords are being used, but the extension chords come with an extra safety device to prevent this.

Another issue with the property room at CSP-Corcoran is that they interpret the new rules in their own way, even lying to their bosses. An example from daily life:

“An associate warden here contacted the property room about my underwear. Initially, the property room claimed that long-sleeved tee-shirts are not allowed. The property room then told the associate warden that I could not have it, because it is a “V-neck teeshirt,” and that they are “not allowed.” These were lies: Not only is this not a v-neck teeshirt, but “v-neck teeshirts are allowed. This was a property officer blatantly lying to one of his bosses – and the associate warden knew that it was a lie.”

Property Matrix January 24, 2014 Inmate Property, CDCR, p. 11

Property Matrix January 24, 2014 Inmate Property, CDCR, p. 10

It has become clear to many people locked up inside CSP-Corcoran that the new property matrix (which we could no longer find online, but we scanned these 2 pages from what was sent to us in March by prisoners) is not being made public to the corporations issuing the catalogues where-from families can order packages for their loved ones, and that employees are not well informed at all on what is and what is not allowed. And – really – how many more petty rules does the cdcr have in store for us to waste precious time and energy on? Is that another trick to keep us from the struggle for human rights?

We are wondering if the administration of CSP-Corcoran realizes that this whole keeping back of property, cell-searching and other harassments made to prisoners in the SHU (racism by some staff  is a becoming a returning complaint, amongst others) certainly is no incentive for those locked down in the segregation units to cooperate with the CDCR-designed Step Down Programs.

Please grant the requests of California SHU-prisoners in CSP-Corcoran-SHU 4B-1L-C Section and 4B Facility

To be delivered to: Connie Gipson, Warden, Michael Stainer, Cherita Wofford, Ombudsman, and Sara Malone, Ombudsman


Petition Statement

These requests to the warden are basic, modest  and do-able, all pertaining to local issues like food, cleaning of the unit, visiting, and tv-access paid for by the prisoners themselves.

Petition Background

This petition asks you to review and respond to a few simple requests that prisoners in Corcoran-SHU have asked us to negotiate for on their behalf:

See the added list of 13 items, all very logical and humane, modest, none are undoable or unreasonable. They wrote these requests in a letter they sent you more than a month ago (around September/October 2013), to which you have yet to respond.

Some of these demands were negotiated successfully at Calipatria ASU. For instance, on the Memorandum of Sept 3rd 2013, the warden of Cal stated: “expanded the Canteen list effective September 2013…” Also: “two phones are installed in A5 pending activation.”

13 Local Requests of 4B-1L-C Section and 4B Facility, CSP-Corcoran-SHU

To: The Warden, Mrs Connie Gipson
Facility Captain
cc: Ombudsman Cherita Wofford, Sara Malone

1) Visiting
We are requesting that visiting be increased to 2 1/2 hours, and 3 1/2 hours for visitors who travel 100 miles or more.

2) Additional TV-stations
We are requesting that the administration add eight (8) additional stations to the basic package made available to us.
We are requesting that a contract with a cable service provider (such as Direct TV) be established with money from the Inmate Welfare Fund.

We were told that this was supposed to have occurred well over a year ago. By contracting with a cable service provider it would improve the quality of the picture on several stations (channels: 2 (PBS), 6 (NBC), 8 (My TV), 5 (CW). The picture is, always, so bad that they cannot be watched.
We would like to request that the following stations be added to the basic package: …

3) Packages
Policy changes to the title 15 now allow those of us in segregated housing to be issued clothing items, a bowl and tumbler, as well as religious items.

We are requesting that we be allowed, consistent with the new rules and regulations:
one (1) special purchase, “non-food”-package per year.

In the alternative we are requesting that the Administration establish a “grace period,” and in this grace period allow us to receive one (1) special purchase “non-food”-package.

4) Food
While the CDCR policy does require that we be provided with a “heart-healthy diet,” we are not. The quality of the food is so bad that on more than one occasion the food during the evening meals has been referred to as “looking like brains.”

In the alternative, if the administration will not require that changes be made in the quality and quantity of the meals, then we are requesting that we be provided the opportunity to order two (2) annual food packages a year.

We are also requesting that the administration include in the lunches more variety. Processed lunched meat and peanut butter are all that we are issued. The only fruit that we receive are one (1) apple or banana. The apple and banana are routinely rotten / overripe.

Canned fruit, peaches, pineapples, pears can be provided and are available.

Tuna fish, cheese and meat spreads can be provided instead of the processed meat is that we are routinely given. It has been established that processed foods do contribute to increased health risks. (see for instance: Harvard School of Public Health: “Beyond Willpower: Diet Quality and Quantity Matter”, page visited on 12/2/13).

5) Yard
Rarely do we receive our ten (10) hours of yard per week, as policy requires.
One reason for this is because the concrete yards in this building are not used.
If two (2) cells are allowed out to the concrete yard, three (3) times a day, it would go a long way toward our having an opportunity to receive our ten (10) hours of yard per week.

Even on those occasions in which regular yard is not allowed, the concrete yards can be.

This has been done over the years on the 4B-yard. And was being done in this building, briefly, last year.

6) Additional canteen items.
Particularly in light of the food department’s failure to provide us with a heart-healthy diet, as well as a diet that lacks any qualitative or quantitative value, we are requesting that additional canteen items, similar to those items that were on the canteen list previously (tuna, chicken breast).
And that chili-flavored soup be included on the canteen list.
And that one other or additional cold cereal be included on the canteen list.

7) Showers.
Presently, the showers are only cleaned three (3) times a week. We are requesting that an additional shower cleaner be allowed to come out so as to ensure that the showers will be cleaned six (6) days a week, as they should be.

8) Telephone calls.
We are requesting that one (1) non-emergency phone call per month be allowed for all SHU prisoners.

9) TV accessories.
We are requesting allowance of TV-accessories that are approved for privilege group D (earphones, headphone extension, splitters, RCA signal amplifiers).

10) Cleaning.
We are requesting authorizing , in addition to the showers to be cleaned six (6) days a week, that the section be cleaned three (3) days a week (swept, mopped, as well as cell fronts, stairs and rails, and holding cages inside of section).

11) Step Down Program
We request to have the time in the Step Down Program reduced.

12) Step 3
We request STEP 3 for prisoners who are validated as STG1 member or associate, and who has been housed in solitary confinement for a minimum of five (5) years.

13) Contact Visits.
We request contact visits pursuant to paragraph 3334 (K) of the Title 15.

We have been told on several occasions that each of the approved vendors (Walkenhorst’s, Access, Union Supply and Golden State Packages) have been contacted and informed that we are allowed to purchase and possess additional personal property items as well as religious items. However, only one of the vendors, Golden State Packages, will send all of the items. None of the other vendors have been notified of any changes.

Also, we are no longer allowed to receive tennis shoes. This prison has reneged on this altogether. They have told us that the vendors would be contacted over the past two (2) years.

In closing, we would like to thank you for your patience and understanding in this matter. And hope that we might hear from you in an effort to resolve this.

Respectfully,
On behalf of 4B 1L-C-Section, and 4B Facility. 

Prisoner in Corcoran SHU Dies While on Hunger Strike

We are very sad and very concerned that this has happened. We wish everyone who was a friend, comrade, fellow prisoner, family member, consolation. As the person who reported the news wrote, “his life mattered.” 

For Immediate Release–July 27, 2013

Prisoner in Corcoran SHU Dies While on Hunger Strike
Fellow Prisoners Mourn, Advocates Raise Questions About His Death 

Press Contact: Isaac Ontiveros
Ph: 510 517 6612

Oakand–
Mediators working on behalf of hunger striking prisoners have received disturbing  news that Billy Michael Sell, known to his friends as Guero, died while on strike at Corcoran State Prison Security Housing Unit (SHU) [housed in 4B-3L of the Corcorcan SHU] on Monday, July 22.  His death is being ruled a suicide by prison officials.  

Fellow prisoners have reported that Sell was participating in California’s massive statewide hunger strike–now in its 20th day.  They further reported that Sell had been requesting medical attention for several days prior to his death.  They described Sell as “strong, a good person” and  openly questioned the California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation (CDCR) ruling his death a suicide, saying it was “completely out of character for him.”   

Advocates are outraged at Sell’s death, noting that it could have been prevented if CDCR had negotiated with strikers. 

Mediators are working to get further accurate information and accountability from the CDCR.  “This story is deeply troubling and contradicts the assurances that the hunger-striking prisoners are receiving appropriate medical care,” Says Ron Ahnen, of California Prison Focus and the mediation team representing striking prisoners. 

Mediators have made an official inquiry to the federal receiver overseeing California’s prisons.  This report comes amid growing concern for the medical care strikers are receiving, along with continued condemnation of the CDCR’s response to the strike and Gov. Brown’s total silence on the issue.

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A HUMAN RIGHTS PEN PAL PROGRAM

We hope it is not too late (it is never too late to join a pen pal group and be one!)

Received via email:

Occupy 4 Prisoners (O4P) is hosting a new project we hope will spark interest among activists and people of conscience alike.  Join us in a Human Rights Pen Pal group, a program combining prison correspondence, political education, and sharing what you’ve learned. See below for a detailed description.

Please consider becoming a pen pal to a person imprisoned in California’s solitary confinement cells and fighting for their human rights.  If interested, please contact Denise at deniselynn777@gmail.org by March 8 to receive an application.

And please help us spread the word to other interested folks.

In solidarity,

Denise Mewbourne & Molly Batchelder
Occupy 4 Prisoners

******************************

***********************
A HUMAN RIGHTS PEN PAL PROGRAM:
A Project of Occupy 4 Prisoners (O4P)

WHAT IS THE HUMAN RIGHTS PEN PAL PROGRAM?

“How can any of us stand idly by while our public officials stride the world stage touting the inalienable rights of man, and criticizing other nations for their alleged human rights abuses, when the US is operating the largest domestic torture program on earth in SHU’s like Corcoran?”
-New Afrikan Revolutionary Nationalist Collective Think Tank, Corcoran SHU

“A wall is just a wall;
It can be broken down.”
-Assata Shakur

The Human Rights Pen Pal program is an anti-racist, grassroots organizer training program in solidarity with incarcerated activists fighting for the human rights of people imprisoned in California’s solitary confinement cells. It is based on the model created and piloted this year by the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity (PHSS) coalition, and promotes principled relationships between people in solitary confinement and supporters outside the walls. The program combines solidarity practice, political education, community organizing skills, and evaluation.

The Human Rights Pen Pal program is specifically intended to support the ongoing work of Occupy 4 Prisoners (O4P), as well as the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity (PHSS) coalition. O4P arose as a powerful coalition combining the powerful new energy of the Occupy movement with established Bay Area activist groups working in solidarity with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people. The PHSS works to end solitary confinement, otherwise known as SHUs (Security Housing Units) and Ad Segs (Administrative Segregation), as well as to address the human rights of people imprisoned in these torture chambers.

WHAT WILL THE HUMAN RIGHTS PEN PAL PROGRAM LOOK LIKE?

Solidarity: The program is designed to foster pen pal relationships between people inside and outside the walls, in the interest of a mutual exchange of support, shared information and inspiration. We will energize each other in this struggle! It also assumes that developing relationships will lead to a growing commitment of those ‘outside the walls’ to work in solidarity with activists on the inside and their human rights campaigns.

The ‘outside the walls’ O4P group will be limited to 10-12, with each pen pal writing to one or more people in solitary confinement, from prisons with SHUs throughout California. The pen pals group will meet monthly, and the meeting will have two major components: political education and social/logistical support for the act of corresponding itself.

Political Education: The political education component will include readings and discussions about California prisons, solitary confinement, the history of resistance by incarcerated people, and strategies of solidarity used by local and national anti-prison organizations.

Supporting each other: This includes: sharing in the group what we’re learning from our pen pals (without necessarily using their names); exchanging ideas for responding to their letters; discussion of tactics and support for spreading awareness about solitary confinement to our friends and family; evaluating our work together. In order for this work to be as sustainable as possible, the group will include emotional support as needed.

Sharing what we’ve learned in the larger world: We intend to foster human connections and the understanding that when anyone is tortured and oppressed within a society, it reverberates throughout the entire culture as social trauma. The humble act of letter correspondence with imprisoned people, especially when we share what we have learned with others, is crucial to breaking down the societal compartmentalization that enables this kind of oppression to endure.
‘OUTSIDE THE WALLS’ PEN PALS WILL BE ASKED TO COMMIT TO:

(1) Regular correspondence with your ‘inside the walls’ pen pal(s) twice monthly.

(2) Attending a three hour monthly meeting. These meetings will continue from March through August (6 months). The Oakland location is TBD, and rides will be organized if needed.

(3) Actively participating in the interactive political education component, which consists of reading suggested short essays, preparing questions for discussion at the group meetings, and keeping abreast of O4P, PHSS and other anti-prison events and activities.

(4) Sharing your experiences as a pen pal participant with your own friends and networks.

(5) Consider continuing your correspondence with your prisoner pen pal for at least a year, with discussion of whether or not the structured pen pal program should continue and, if so, in what form.

HOW TO APPLY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE HUMAN RIGHTS PEN PAL PROGRAM
(Deadline March 10)

For more info and to receive an application, contact Denise at deniselynn777@gmail.com Leave your email address and phone number. Deadline for returning applications is March 10. The first Pen Pal meeting will take place the fourth week of March 2013.