Call now to demand freedom & medical care for Mumia


From the Enewsletter of Prison Radio:

Dear friend, 

April 29, 2015

On Monday morning Mumia Abu-Jamal was ordered back to the infirmary at SCI Mahanoy in Pennsylvania. All that day his attorney Bret Grote was at the prison.  No visitors were allowed, he and Pam Africa could not see Mumia.  There has been no contact with Mumia since Sunday, by his family, doctors, lawyers or supporters and there is grave concern that his condition, untreated and mistreated by prison infirmary doctors, could result in his death.

All Out to the Capital

The Dept. of Corrections has turned down Mumia’s petition to be given a accurate diagnosis of his condition(s) and his need to be seen by appropriate medical specialists.  His doctor has been prevented from talking to treatment staff and visiting Mumia.   

On Wednesday, April 29th we will be holding a press conference at Gov. Tom Wolf’s office in Harrisburg, PA at the Capitol Rotunda at 11am. 

At this point we do not know what is happening with Mumia. Keep your eyes on Mumia! Demand family visitation, and legal access.  We must speak out for our brother Mumia, just as he has always spoken out for us. 

Call now to demand freedom & medical care for Mumia:


Often when we call in, prison and state officials have taken their lines off the hook. Know that every single action matters, even when they don’t pick up. If they don’t answer, please leave a voicemail:

John Wetzel, PA Secretary of Corrections: (717) 728-4109
Governor Tom Wolf: (717) 787-2500
SCI Mahanoy: (570) 773-2158, then dial zero
for a more complete list of addresses and faxes etc visit www.prison Radio.org

Voices from Solitary: “No Wonder There Are So Many Suicides”

From: SolitaryWatch
Dec 17th 2012

The following comes from a prisoner currently housed in maximum security housing at Utah State Prison, Draper. He has spent, by his estimate, seven years in either supermaximum or maximum security housing. He recently had a heart attack in maximum security and reportedly has received minimal health care treatment while incarcerated. He describes here the  Uinta 1 facility, where over 90 inmates are held in long-term isolation. –Sal Rodriguez

I spent the first two years of my incarceration in general population at a county jail. I had my first heart attack while at the county jail due to misdiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes. Despite my repeated attempts to get medical help, the officials repeatedly denied that there was anything wrong with me even though I exhibited all of the symptoms and signs of diabetes. Eventually, the misdiagnosed diabetes led to the heart attack.

I spent nine days in Intensive Care at the University Medical Center before being released back to prison where I was promptly placed in supermax–Uinta 1. I had not committed any violations to be placed in supermax other than having a heart attack.

I wasn’t considered a protective custody case, as I had just spent two years in general population. No reason was given for my being housed in supermax. I spent only a few months in supermax before being shipped out to another prison out of state. Once back in Utah I was once again placed in supermax without due process or reason, and I spent the next 20 months locked down. I have spent about seven years or more now housed in either supermax or max. I have never had any write-ups or violations to warrant me being housed in maximum security.

I can tell you that life in supermax (Uinta 1) is inhumane. There are inmates still being housed in that unit who have been there for eight years or more, who started off completely sane but now have lost all sanity. Suicide was common in the Uinta’s just a few years ago, forcing the prison to take preventative measures by installing new vent-housings that wouldn’t allow a rope to be tied to it for hanging. There is still many suicides that occur there, although its not like it used to be years ago.

The abuses still continue today with some of the torture techniques used in foreign interrogation. Cells are kept cold, lights are kept on 24/7, guards purposely make noise at all hours to prevent sleep.
Windows are covered by a small door that is only opened when the guard occasionally  looks in, as for count. Mental health care is a joke, as the mental health worker goes cell to cell not spending more than five seconds at each door and only asks “Are you ok?” It’s no wonder there are so many suicides. Mental health shows a lack of concern for those in supermax. It’s the general attitude there.

Be ashamed, PA DOC! A female prisoner with diabetes dies as a result of direct medical neglect in a PA prison

We received this message from facebook. We urge the authorities to conduct an investigation into the death of this woman in prison who had diabetes and who needed insulin, a life-saving medication, together with her daily intake of food. We left out the name of the person trying to help her for fear of possible retaliation. Those responsible for the death of Tonya Green should be held accountable.

Tonya Green, the inmate in the cell next door, ‘cried and begged 6 days for help, and no-one helped her. She was unable to get herself up off the floor, and no-one helped her get up, so therefore they did not give her food and she did not take her insulin.’

The doctor came and shouted at her, ignoring her pleas for help. On the morning of the seventh day, the fellow prisoner found Tonya lying dead on the floor of her cell. She reported this to the guards but it took them another four hours to decide to go in and check on Tonya. Their attempts to revive her were, by then, futile.

I have no idea what Tonya had done to be serving a prison sentence but the way she was left to die was perverse and inhumane. Her death would probably be classified by law as caused by grave neglect. Manslaughter, maybe? Taking into account everyone knew Tonya was diabetic and needed insulin, you might even call it murder.

Another Nevada Prisoner Death at High Desert State Prison

Taken over from Nevada Prisoner Voice:

WILLIAM J. BROOKS, Age 51 and Five Months
Born 2/13/58 Died 7/22/2009

Can a Nevada prison sentence become a death sentence? Yes, we think it can.

Did Mr. Brooks lie gasping on the yard without rapid officer response or medical assistance?

Did prison officials take Mr. Brooks, reported as diabetic, to the hospital or did he die in the infirmary?

No telephone response at High Desert State Prison… Nevada State Highway Patrol Trooper also called HDSP, but also got no response

7:18 PM 29 July 2009…
Confirmation or denial of this report as soon as contact can be made with prisons officials… Efforts were made to confirm Mr. Brooks’ death through Nevada prison officials 30 July 2009 AM… to no avail.

But, at 10:23 AM this morning, 30 July 2009, the Clark County Coroner’s Office confirmed Mr. Brooks’ death. Nevada prisoners have shorter average life spans than those of free citizens in the USA, based upon current information that we are compiling.