Call now to demand freedom & medical care for Mumia


From the Enewsletter of Prison Radio:

Dear friend, 

April 29, 2015

On Monday morning Mumia Abu-Jamal was ordered back to the infirmary at SCI Mahanoy in Pennsylvania. All that day his attorney Bret Grote was at the prison.  No visitors were allowed, he and Pam Africa could not see Mumia.  There has been no contact with Mumia since Sunday, by his family, doctors, lawyers or supporters and there is grave concern that his condition, untreated and mistreated by prison infirmary doctors, could result in his death.

All Out to the Capital

The Dept. of Corrections has turned down Mumia’s petition to be given a accurate diagnosis of his condition(s) and his need to be seen by appropriate medical specialists.  His doctor has been prevented from talking to treatment staff and visiting Mumia.   

On Wednesday, April 29th we will be holding a press conference at Gov. Tom Wolf’s office in Harrisburg, PA at the Capitol Rotunda at 11am. 

At this point we do not know what is happening with Mumia. Keep your eyes on Mumia! Demand family visitation, and legal access.  We must speak out for our brother Mumia, just as he has always spoken out for us. 

Call now to demand freedom & medical care for Mumia:


Often when we call in, prison and state officials have taken their lines off the hook. Know that every single action matters, even when they don’t pick up. If they don’t answer, please leave a voicemail:

John Wetzel, PA Secretary of Corrections: (717) 728-4109
Governor Tom Wolf: (717) 787-2500
SCI Mahanoy: (570) 773-2158, then dial zero
for a more complete list of addresses and faxes etc visit www.prison Radio.org

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Amy Buckley in Mississippi prison: I will not give up until I receive the medical care I deserve

From: SF Bay View, September 26, 2014

by Amy Buckley

On July 18, 2014, I was told to pack and was transferred to Central Mississippi Correctional Facility in Pearl, Miss. Since I was not informed as to why I was being transferred, I have surmised that it was for medical purposes because I had abnormal results on some recent lab work.

I originally left this compound on Sept. 24, 2010, with the hope of never seeing it again, but here I sit. I wish I could say that things here have improved. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

CMCF is the processing center for all men and women coming into the prison system. This facility also houses just over 2,300 men long-term and less than 1,000 women who are compound-restricted due to medical conditions such as AIDS, pregnancy and heart problems and those with life sentences. Sadly, this is one of the worst – it is the worst for women – facilities in the state.

Conditions here are deplorable. There are 116 women per open zone (dorm) and no air conditioning. Lice, boils, staph infections, scabies and AIDS are rampant. The food is barely edible. Medical care is insufficient to non-existent. Mold grows on the shower walls and no matter how many times you scrub it off it grows right back. These are simply a few of the problems here.

Since arriving here on Friday, I have yet to be seen by a case manager and have not been issued any clothes. For five days now I have been wearing the same jumpsuit I was made to put on for being transported.

I approached Lt. Bates several times attempting to ask about getting clothes, only to be swatted away like I was a pesky fly. I also approached the case manager, Ms. Gattis, who said she would see me later but failed to do so. I have also written both of the above and received no response.

Without seeing the case manager, I cannot use the phones to contact my family because I have to fill out a phone list and get a PIN number to do so. Ms. Gattis would also be able to address any issues and concerns that I have at this time. To add to this incompetence, I have yet to see a doctor to find out what, if anything, needs to be done concerning my medical needs.

Being back here saddens me because I see the condition of some of these women. Many walk around like zombies, drugged out of their minds and seemingly unaware of their surroundings.

It is easier for a person to see the prison psychiatrist and get any psych drug available, even if they do not need it, than it is to see a nurse or medical doctor when one is truly ill. Many are denied medical care until hospitalization is the only option left and others die waiting to see a doctor.

I know how easy it is to get stuck on this compound, lost in this broken system, forced to work in inhumane conditions without pay or be written up for refusing to work until you land in Max. Despite being prisoners of the state of Mississippi, we have the right to receive prompt medical treatment, clean clothes to wear, a clean and safe living environment and access to our families, i.e., phone calls and visits.

The Mississippi Department of Corrections may not care about my health, but my health is important to me and my family. When I came into this system I was healthy and I plan to leave healthy! I will not give up until I receive the medical care I deserve. The beast will not win!

I will not give up until I receive the medical care I deserve.

Send our sister some love and light: Amy Buckley, 150005, CMCF-2A B-Zone 162, P.O. Box 88550, Pearl, MS 39288. Transcribed by Adrian McKinney from handwritten letter.

Amy has cervical cancer – write the Parole Board to release her

Amy Buckley is known across the country as a wise and courageous advocate for women prisoners. This is the Bay View’s most recent letter from Amy, postmarked July 30. Activist Twitch Entropy reports hearing from Amy that as of Sept. 6, despite an apparent diagnosis of cervical cancer, she still hasn’t seen a doctor, though she’d been in severe pain for a week. She hopes the cancer will be arrested with a hysterectomy.

Back home, her father is suffering from advanced mantle cell lymphoma, a rare form of blood cancer, and her son needs her. So her aunt is gathering parole support letters.

Your letter should be addressed to State of Mississippi Parole Board, Attn: Steve Pickett and Parole Board Members, 660 North St., Suite 100A, Jackson, MS 39202. Don’t mail it direct to the board but rather to Amy’s aunt: Trish Gray-Lee, 862 Jolly Road, Columbus, MS 39705. Amy deserves a special dispensation for her own and her father’s medical crises, justifying a supervised medical release, Twitch suggests.

Oregon DOC Attempting to Kill Kevin “Rashid” Johnson!

Posted on by kersplebedeb, on Rashid’s website:

Kevin “Rashid” Johnson is a New Afrikan Communist prison organizer and intellectual in the United States and one of the founders of the NABPP-PC (New Afrikan Black Panther Party-Prison Chapter). He has spent most of his adult life in the prison system and continually been subjected to political repression and violence in retaliation for his organizing efforts. He is currently held at Snake River Correctional Inst in Oregon.

After a long and uncharacteristic silence in communication with him and no information on his circumstances – a supporter received the following letter from another prisoner:

 “This is about Rashid. We need a lot of help. They are trying to kill him. On Jan. 31 they put something in his food that made him crazy. On Feb. 2 he took 30 pills. They did not do anything to get the pills out of him…. On Jan. 4 [sic; I assume he means Feb. 4] he ate 3 razor blades. This is all on videotape. They lied and said the X-ray showed nothing. The [blades] are still in him right now. 

He has not eaten since Feb. 3. He has not drunk anything since Feb. 5…. He is passing out and they won’t do anything to help him…. Said he is the one that won’t eat or drink so they are not helping him at all. He is peeing blood and has bad kidney pains…. Med staff will not give him IV fluids…. [As of Feb. 10 he had] lost over 16 pounds. His blood pressure is 191/100 and his urine is the color of coffee….”


It is of the upmost importance to put ALL POSSIBLE PRESSURE on the Oregon DOC AS SOON AS POSSIBLE in order to protect this comrades life!

Please call Snake River at 541-881-5000 and dial 0 to speak with a staff member and express your concern over the situation:

Also call the DOC Inspector General at (877) 678-4222 and Oregon DOC at 503-945-9090.

Fax number for Snake River Superintendent’s Office is (541)881-5460.

Email address of Snake River Superintendent Mark Nooth is mark.s.nooth@state.or.us.

Snake River is open 8-5 MST.  Further details on the situation and support actions will be posted here as they become available.

Voices from Solitary: “No Wonder There Are So Many Suicides”

From: SolitaryWatch
Dec 17th 2012

The following comes from a prisoner currently housed in maximum security housing at Utah State Prison, Draper. He has spent, by his estimate, seven years in either supermaximum or maximum security housing. He recently had a heart attack in maximum security and reportedly has received minimal health care treatment while incarcerated. He describes here the  Uinta 1 facility, where over 90 inmates are held in long-term isolation. –Sal Rodriguez

I spent the first two years of my incarceration in general population at a county jail. I had my first heart attack while at the county jail due to misdiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes. Despite my repeated attempts to get medical help, the officials repeatedly denied that there was anything wrong with me even though I exhibited all of the symptoms and signs of diabetes. Eventually, the misdiagnosed diabetes led to the heart attack.

I spent nine days in Intensive Care at the University Medical Center before being released back to prison where I was promptly placed in supermax–Uinta 1. I had not committed any violations to be placed in supermax other than having a heart attack.

I wasn’t considered a protective custody case, as I had just spent two years in general population. No reason was given for my being housed in supermax. I spent only a few months in supermax before being shipped out to another prison out of state. Once back in Utah I was once again placed in supermax without due process or reason, and I spent the next 20 months locked down. I have spent about seven years or more now housed in either supermax or max. I have never had any write-ups or violations to warrant me being housed in maximum security.

I can tell you that life in supermax (Uinta 1) is inhumane. There are inmates still being housed in that unit who have been there for eight years or more, who started off completely sane but now have lost all sanity. Suicide was common in the Uinta’s just a few years ago, forcing the prison to take preventative measures by installing new vent-housings that wouldn’t allow a rope to be tied to it for hanging. There is still many suicides that occur there, although its not like it used to be years ago.

The abuses still continue today with some of the torture techniques used in foreign interrogation. Cells are kept cold, lights are kept on 24/7, guards purposely make noise at all hours to prevent sleep.
Windows are covered by a small door that is only opened when the guard occasionally  looks in, as for count. Mental health care is a joke, as the mental health worker goes cell to cell not spending more than five seconds at each door and only asks “Are you ok?” It’s no wonder there are so many suicides. Mental health shows a lack of concern for those in supermax. It’s the general attitude there.

83 year old Peace Activist with medical condition held in SHU with no heating (SEATAC)

“Forget about your doctor back home; I’m your doctor now.”
(a guard to a 83 year old peacemaker in federal prison)

This came to us via email. It concerns a 83 year old Jesuit monk, Bill Bichsel, aka Bix to his friends, who is a peace maker and who witnessed with his blood the naval base where nuclear weapons are stored in Washington State, Nov. 2009.

He is currently serving a sentence for another witness and pro-peace action, and he was released on what seemed like parole, a few days ago, before his final release on Feb 9th.

On his release he had to travel to a halfway house alone for hours, was not allowed to have contact with anyone for 72 hours after “release.” The following day he was returned to SEATAC, the federal prison in Washington State, for incredibly minor “violations.” What the prison does to him, is in fact criminal.

From: Blake Kremer, per email

Bix called around 2 PM today and said that he would like a visit from
me. He related to me the following:

“Found out at a hearing on Tuesday the BOP’s reason for taking him in
to custody. Brought two people in from the halfway house to describe
the incident when the monks came to greet me. I did not know the
monks were coming, but I threw them some kisses and that was it. The
next morning the marshal came and took me in to custody.

I am now on non-compliance and in the SHU. I entered in to a fast –
this is my ninth day. I am amazed at how much strength I am getting.
No food at all – just water. Every morning they bring me breakfast; I
just take two half pints of milk. I feel with all of this my spirit
feels great. It is very cold for me all of the time. I cannot sleep
at all – 24 hours a day without sleep, fighting off the chill. I have
asked for a jacket or a pillow or a mattress; they do not comply.

I am very delighted in the way that this has happened. Welcome
angels singing joy and peace is the theme that comes to me. Rejoice
Rejoice Rejoice – I loved the visit from the monks that lead to his
current imprisonment. I am where I should be. I am good.

I am cold all the time, I wear a blanket. I am in bed all the time
to stay warm.

I am deeply thankful for where I am and I feel a deep sense of god’s
presence. I would like to have others join in the fast if they want
to. There is a fast for Christian unity from 18th to the 25th. I
would like others to consider joining in or being more conscious of
our call to eliminate nuclear weapons or oppose unconscionable actions
and inhumane treatment. I told BOP that I would not comply, as a
matter of conscious. They said: this is a matter of policy not
conscience. I said: that is exactly my point. And that is what I
would like others to consider: that what is policy for some is not
acceptable for Christians.”

This is from an email from another supporter:

***Stay tuned today for information regarding a vigil in response to
prison abuse at SeaTac***

The final line of Bix’s call yesterday to Blake is what I want to
address. “What is policy for some (Bureau of Prisons) is not
acceptable for Christians.”

It is policy for prisons to deny the cries of inmate’s for basic human
needs. (See Plowshares News – May 11, 29 and 31, 2011). It is policy
for prisons to keep the environment cool/cold as well.

Bix is an octogenarian. At 83, I guarantee, our physical needs are
radically different than at 53, or even 73. In contrast, the age of
most prison guards (from my observations) is closer to 33. Supplying
additional warmth is not preferential treatment; it is simply a
rational response to basic physiology.

When Bix went into SeaTac on November 11, he brought a list of his
medications and a letter from his primary care physician. The bulk of
the letter related to Bix’s overall medical condition and needs; but,
it was prefaced by a cover letter specifically addressing Bix’s need
for extra clothing and warmth due to coronary and circulatory
deficits. His doctor explained, in detail, how painful it would be to
Bix if his extremities are subjected to ongoing cold. This letter is
in the medical file at SeaTac. It is being ignored.

Earlier this year, in response to a medical request from Bix, a guard
cut off the conversation to say, “Forget about your doctor back home;
I’m your doctor now.”

Yes, guards and administrators in jails and prisons can treat inmates
inhumanely simply because they can; but, it also seems that the milieu
of prison life is geared toward punishment. At the Knox County
Sheriff’s Detention Facility, where Bix was imprisoned in Knoxville, a
long document that listed the purposes of the facility was posted on
the bulletin board. The first 2 items on the list were their statement
of ownership and the mission statement of delivering “punishment.”

Whether or not jail and prison administrators are directly complicit
in the day to day cruelty of those they supervise; they are answerable
for maintaining an environment that caters to punishment, rather than
rehabilitation. By dehumanizing inmates, whether at Abu Ghraib or the
Podunk County jail, administrators at the top give tacit approval to
soldiers/guards all the way down the line to be creative in their
punishments.

It is important for us to voice disapproval of Bix’s cruel treatment.
Please take a few minutes today to let people on the list below know
that the community cannot tolerate this treatment of Bix or of any of
the 824 prisoners held at SeaTac today. If you know of others who
should hear from us, please contact them and then send me a note –
I’ll add your suggestions to the list. The more letters we get out,
the more likely someone with compassion will intervene.

Contact your government representatives

http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml

Also:

Charles E. Samuels, Jr.
Director, Federal Bureau of Prisons
320 First St., NW,
Washington, DC 20534
Office hours: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Eastern time
Monday through Friday
For general information, call 202-307-3198.

Willie Jusino, Warden
Federal Detention Center SeaTac
P.O. Box 13901
Seattle, WA 98198
Phone: 206-870-5700
Fax: 206-870-5717

Marion Feather, Warden,
SeaTac Federal Detention Center
mxfeather@bop.gov.

Terry McGuire
The Catholic Northwest Progress
710 9th Avenue
Seattle, WA 98104
Terry.McGuire@seattlearch.org
Phone: 206-382-4560
Fax: 206-382-4840

The News Tribune
P.O. Box 11000, Tacoma, WA 98411
Phone: 253-597-8742
David A. Zeeck
Publisher & President
(253) 597-8554
david.zeeck@thenewstribune.com

The Seattle Times
PO Box 70, Seattle, WA 98111
Newsroom: (206) 464-2200
Newsroom fax: (206) 464-2261
Newsroom and Seattletimes.com staff
Main: (206) 464-2111
Accepts letters of up to 200 words at opinion@seattletimes.com.

Lucasville uprising prisoner dies in ohio

By Sharon Danann
in: Workers World
Published Sep 17, 2011

Abdul-Muhaymin Nuruddin

Abdul-Muhaymin Nuruddin, a prisoner convicted as James Bell, died this past week of an apparent heart attack while in custody. His body has yet to be released so that his funeral can take place, in disregard of Muslim custom of burial within 24 hours.

Nuruddin was a negotiator on behalf of the prisoners during the 1993 rebellion in Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville, Ohio. He was held in high esteem by his fellow prisoners for his work in SOCF’s law library, where he prepared appeals, writs of habeas corpus and civil law suits.

Nuruddin was convicted of felonious assault following the Lucasville rebellion. The prosecution maintained he was the “right hand man” of Imam Siddique Abdullah Hasan, another prisoner negotiator. Hasan received the death penalty for his alleged role in the uprising.

Nuruddin’s longtime pen pal, Karen Thimmes, states: “Before he came back to Ohio [in 2007], Nuruddin was housed in federal institutions, first in the SuperMax in Florence [Colo.], later at a federal medical facility due to his kidney problems. When the Feds suggested to Ohio DRC [Department of Rehabilitation and Correction] that they would do a kidney transplant on Nuruddin if Ohio would foot the bill, Ohio pulled him out of the federal system and brought him back to Ohio, allegedly claiming that lifetime dialysis was cheaper than a transplant.” (prisonersolidarity Yahoo group)

Twice in the past four years, Nuruddin contracted serious MRSA [methicillin-resistant staphyloccus aureus] infections at his dialysis port which he believed were the result of inadequate attention to hygenic procedures, according to Thimmes. She maintains he was also forced to choose between dialysis and Muslim prayers on Fridays. In 2008, the ODRC forcibly cut Nuruddin’s beard in violation of his religious rights.

While at ODRC’s Pickaway Correctional Institution, guards threatened Nuruddin’s life. They also failed to intervene when his neck was cut near his jugular vein by another prisoner. They locked up a prisoner who came to his defense. ODRC refused to take action on the complaints he filed about these and other incidents.

Brother Nuruddin will be remembered for his courageous participation in prisoner advocacy campaigns, including the ongoing struggle to overturn other wrongful convictions of Lucasville-uprising prisoners, five of whom received death sentences. Another of his lasting contributions was an Islamic newsletter called “Pristine Truths,” which he published in the 1990s.

As the deaths and numerous disabling injuries of the then New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller-led massacre of prisoners in Attica Correctional Facility 40 years ago are memorialized, the lives saved by the prisoners in Lucasville who negotiated a settlement with ODRC should also be honored. Recalling that N.Y. Gov. Hugh Carey ordered all indictments from the Attica rebellion vacated, the struggle will continue until the Lucasville-uprising convictions are reversed and Nuruddin’s former fellow inmates walk free.

Comments in memory of Nuruddin may be sent to lucasvillefreedom@gmail.com.


Articles copyright 1995-2011 Workers World. Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is permitted in any medium without royalty provided this notice is preserved.

Human Rights Coalition PA Prison Report

Emailed to Prisonwatch on June 14th 2011:
In this edition: Sexual harassment and medical neglect of women at SCI Muncy, abuse continues in the solitary units at SCI Cresson, jailhouse lawyer Andre Jacobs seeks a court injunction against retaliation by prison staff, and more..
The News from Inside

Sexual harassment and medical neglect at women’s state prison:

Two recent reports from women incarcerated at SCI Muncy women’s prison describe how on certain units, male prison guards are permitted to come into the bathrooms while the women are using the toilet or showering, and that shower curtains are not tall enough to maintain privacy. The women describe these policies as inappropriate and harmful to their feelings of safety and privacy.One woman reported that male guards have been fired for sexual harassment and escorted off the grounds of the institution, but that policies claim that institutional security trump the needs of individual safety and privacy.

An additional report from an anonymous prisoner describes another woman, Josette Wakely, being brutally beaten by her cellmate on March 3. Surrounding prisoners hit their alert buttons, informing prison guards McElroy and Lorico that Wakely was being beaten and raped. The officers responded by threatening to write up anyone who disturbed them again. It was only after the attacker rang her alert button to inform the officers of what she had done that they attended to the injured woman.Josette Wakely was life-flighted out of the institution and sustained scars and bruises.

Also at Muncy, an anonymous prisoner reported the wrongful death of Tonya Green on April 20, due to medical neglect. The reports that “Green had a history of medical issues and was put in [solitary confinement] after she could not get up from the sidewalk, after they allowed her to stay there for half an hour. They knew this woman was in pain. After she cried out while in [solitary] no one attended her. Later that night she died.” A memorial service was held for Tonya Green at the SCI Muncy chapel.

Prisoner assaulted by guards after protesting illegal search of another man’s cell:

Davon Hayes reports from the Restricted Housing Unit (RHU) at SCI Dallas that after protesting the April 4 search of a nearby prisoner’s cell without the prisoner present, a team of guards then searched his own cell, tampered with his property, and assaulted him while he was handcuffed, leaving him with a fractured left orbital bone.

Hayes reports that after witnessing a search team enter the nearby K-A-35 cell without the occupant present, he spoke up against the search, citing DOC policy ADM 203 which requires that prisoners be physically present during searches of their cells. His words infuriated Sergeant Donald Buck, who immediately called for a team of guards to seach Hayes’ cell. During the search, he was handcuffed behind his back and to his cell window while officers Santero, Fitzgerald, Amos, Headman, and Whiteman threw his legal property in the air, threw his Islamic materials on the floor, and removed his books from the cell. The team then uncuffed him from the window, forced him to the floor, and proceeded to beat him about the face, in the process fracturing his left orbital bone. During the assault, guards repeatedly pressured him to “sign off on the paperwork” and at least one guard yanked and pulled on the tether attached to his handcuffs in an attempt to make it appear that Hayes was resisting the assault.

Hayes has filed a private criminal complaint about the incident. He remains in solitary confinement in the SCI Dallas RHU.

Jailhouse lawyer seeks court injunction as prison continues retaliation:

State prisoner Andre Jacobs filed a motion for a preliminary injunction in the U.S. district court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania in early June seeking a court order to obtain immediate access to his legal property and compel prison authorities to establish a plan for returning him to general population after a decade of solitary confinement. The motion was filed with Judge Kane, who has been assigned to handle Jacobs lawsuit against more than 100 prison officials and employees, law enforcement officers, and mental and medical care providers for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections.

The civil rights suit deals with two years of retaliation that Jacobs has suffered since winning a $185,000 award in a lawsuit against prison staff. Since that victory in November of 2008 he has been subject to assaults, racist harassment, starvation, deprived of all his property on multiple occasions, been issued dozens of fabricated misconducts, had false criminal charges pressed against him, and been separated from most of his legal property for the past 6 months.

The injunction was filed as reports from SCI Rockview indicate an escalation in the threats and retaliation against Mr. Jacobs. According to one declaration, Lt. Andrews refused to permit Jacobs to access his property and made obscene comments and gestures toward him. Another declaration states that Lt. Nixon was reading confidential medical and legal property of Mr. Jacobs, and that she told him to “destroy as much of this shit as possible. Just ask around, I’ll write you up and bury you.” She then seized addresses, pictures, and legal notes of Mr. Jacobs without issuing a confiscation slip.

Lt. Nixon also deprived Jacobs of a shower and a razor.

Superintendent Lamas has also instituted a new policy of restricting solitary confinement prisoners to a maximum of two envelopes per week from commissary, reportedly stating that “Inmates are sending way too many complaints to HRC, the courts and Central Office for grievance appeals. This limits that.”

Abuse continues at SCI Cresson:

Chris Balmer, a 23-year-old state prisoner who has spent the last five years in solitary confinement, is being held in a hard cell without property, basic hygiene products, and running water, and has been placed on food loaf. Balmer is one of several prisoners in the Restricted Housing Unit and Secure Special Needs Unit at SCI Cresson who are being warehoused in solitary confinement and deprived of mental health treatment. The security captain Francis Pirozzola has reportedly been conspiring with guards to target prisoners thought to have knowledge of the abuse and harassment of the late John McClellan prior to his committing suicide. Damont Hagan, a jailhouse lawyer and human rights defender, was transferred from the prison immediately after the suicide. Several other prisoners are rumored to be scheduled for transfer as well, while those who remain report ongoing acts of intimidation, including death threats and starvation.

Announcements
Philly area: Wednesdays are Write On! Prison Letter Writing Night at the LAVA space at 4134 Lancaster, 6-9 pm. Come help us stay connected with the many prisoners who write to us with news from inside, learn to document crimes committed by prison staff, and help bring an end to the abuse and torture of our brothers and sisters behind bars.

If you’d like to know more about the Human Rights Coalition or would like to get involved, come to Write On!, to our monthly general meetings (second Monday of each month, 6pm), or call us at 215-921-3491, email info@hrcoalition.org, or visit our website at http://www.hrcoalition.org/

Pittsburgh area: Write On! – letter writing to prisoners and HRC work night every Wednesday at 5129 Penn Avenue from 7 -10pm. To get involved with HRC/Fed Up! in Pittsburgh,email hrcfedup@gmail.com or call 412-654-9070.

You’ve been listening to the Human Rights Coalition’s PA Prison Report. HRC is a group of current and former prisoners, family members, and supporters, whose ultimate goal is to abolish prisons.

Keep up the fight!